Sandie M Sutton will be exhibiting ghostly foliage created from reclaimed plastic milk cartons in ‘Ghost Forest’ in The Space Leytonstone Library. She will also be showing work in the ‘On the Brink’ exhibition and at the Red Lion Pub. She will also have a stall at the Leyton & Stone Art Fayre.

We asked Sandie some questions about her art practice and ideas.


Julie: Please tell us about the work you will be showing in the Leytonstone Arts Trail in 2016.

Sandie M Sutton: I am showing several art pieces on the Trail – all made from discarded household plastics, reclaimed locally. Milk cartons at the library, old plastic toys in the woods and detergent bottles on a window sill are all transformed into new intriguing forms.


Poison Dart Frog Made from reclaimed household plastics by Sandie M Sutton

Poison Dart Frog
Made from reclaimed household plastics
by Sandie M Sutton



Julie: This is the 9th LAT. Have you taken part in the Trail before and what did you do?

Sandie M Sutton: This is my first time on the Trail and it’s very exciting. I am looking forward to seeing it all come together and to enjoying the other artwork on display.


Julie: Tell us a little bit about your artistic background/education.

Sandie M Sutton: I have an honours degree in stop-frame animation and because I enjoyed creating the detailed sets and models more than the filming process itself I went on to postgraduate studies in sculpture. My strong connection with the natural world inspires and motivates me as an artist.


Julie: What kind of things inspire you to create art?

Sandie M Sutton: My strong connection with the natural world inspires and motivates me as an artist.


Mantella Frog  Made from reclaimed household plastics by Sandie M Sutton

Mantella Frog
Made from reclaimed household plastics
by Sandie M Sutton



Julie: How would you describe a good day in the studio?

Sandie M Sutton: A good day in the studio is an early start with a fresh batch of sketches – a bag of reclaimed plastics needing to be colour matched (quite a relaxing process) – 6 Music on the radio – an artwork that’s almost complete – one that’s just beginning – a lunch time catch up with fellow studio members and a nosy at what they are up to. And lots of tea.


Julie: What challenges (if any) do you face in preparing yourself and your work for the Trail?

Sandie M Sutton: The most challenging aspect for me is financial. Supporting my family and getting regular money coming in. But of course this is a common issue for many professional artists.


Julie: Do you collect art?

Sandie M Sutton: Yes, I do collect art and memories of art based events. I really enjoy having original artworks at home – they give me something to reflect on and become part of my life. I purchase and exchange artwork. I’m instinctively drawn to certain artworks and often only start to understand them later. And I try not to think too much about their investment value, especially after my house rabbit nibbled though some very early David Shrigley prints a few years back!


The Mangled Aye Aye Made from reclaimed household plastics by Sandie M Sutton

The Mangled Aye Aye
Made from reclaimed household plastics
by Sandie M Sutton



Julie: Please tell us something you really like about Leytonstone.

Sandie M Sutton: I like the hustle & bustle of Leytonstone. It’s very buzzy – all life is here. The Red Lion pub is great place to meet up. Cycling from Leytonstone to Epping Forest is lovely.


Julie: Besides the Trail, what is coming up next for you and where can we see more of your art in the flesh or on-line?

Sandie M Sutton: I’m involved in environmental campaigns over the summer and my work will be
on show in many unlikely places – so do keep a look out.

Sandie Sutton’s website: sandiemsutton.com


Ghost Forest Made from reclaimed household plastics by Sandie M Sutton

Ghost Forest
Made from reclaimed household plastics
by Sandie M Sutton