Rose Pearson is exhibiting in ‘Prints and Drawings’ at The Wanstead Tap.

We asked Rose some questions about her art practice and ideas.


Rose Pearson drawing on-site as part of the exhibition 'Process and Preperation' at Stone Space Gallery in February this year

Rose Pearson drawing on-site as part of the exhibition ‘Process and Preperation’ at Stone Space Gallery in February this year


Julie: Please tell us about the work you will be showing in the Leytonstone Arts Trail in 2016.

Rose Pearson: I will be showing a variety of abstract pen drawings and screenprints, I’m still deciding exactly which ones! They are doodles that are repeated and expanded to a slightly absurd level.


Julie: This is the 9th LAT. Have you taken part in the Trail before and what did you do?

Rose Pearson: I showed a mixture of drawings and prints in Café de Montmartre near to Leytonstone Tube station. The work stayed up for a couple of months after the trail.


Julie: Tell us a little bit about your artistic background/education.

Rose Pearson: I did my foundation year at Norwich School of Art and Design and a BA in Fine Art at the University of the West of England in Bristol. While studying I made a lot of sculpture. After university I kept making work, and eventually started making abstract pen drawings. A couple of years later I did a screenprinting course, joined a studio in Bristol and made prints from some of my drawings. I’ve been drawing in a similar style ever since, experimenting with different shapes, and working on different scales.


Untitled blue and purple screenprint by Rose Pearson

Untitled blue and purple screenprint
by Rose Pearson



Julie: How would you describe your art practice? What kind of things inspire you to create art?

Rose Pearson: I make abstract drawings, sometimes I make screenprints from the drawings. They are based on simple hand-drawn shapes, which are repeated many times and though this process subtly alter to create new patterns and unexpected forms. The smallest are around 10cm across, the largest more than 2 metres.

As my work is based on repeated patterns, I am fascinated by them in nature, for example geometric patterns in rocks, and mathematical patterns such as fractals. What makes me want to sit down and make work is when I see really good artwork by other people, particularly if they use repeated patterns, it makes me inspired to make better work of my own.


Julie: How would you describe a good day in the studio?

Rose Pearson: I work from home, in my bedroom, but a good day would be when I get a lot of drawing done, and an especially good day would be when I finish a big drawing, and can stand back and look at it. That’s very satisfying.


Rose Pearson preparing for an exhibition submission

Rose Pearson preparing for an exhibition submission



Julie: What challenges (if any) do you face in preparing yourself and your work for the Trail?

Rose Pearson: I work full time so finding the time and energy to make as much work as I would like! Transporting sometimes heavy framed work safely is also a challenge.


Julie: Do you collect art?

Rose Pearson: I don’t, but this is something that I would like to look into. I will be having a good look at the art on show at this year’s trail and may make a purchase!


Julie: Please tell us something you really like about Leytonstone.

Rose Pearson: I like that it’s got a lot of green space nearby. I also like All You Read is Love Cafe, and getting homemade dumplings at Panda on the High Road.


Julie: Besides the Trail, what is coming up next for you and where can we see more of your art in the flesh or on-line?

Rose Pearson: I don’t currently have plans to exhibit, but I plan to continue making work, specifically colour screenprints of some of my more recent drawings. I’m also planning to make more large scale drawings. You can see more of my work, and get updates about events and exhibitions on my blog at rose-pearson.tumblr.com


Untitled abstract pen drawing by Rose Pearson

Untitled abstract pen drawing
by Rose Pearson